• Browning Blog; The good, the bad and the mouflon

    The good, the bad and the mouflon

    Ever since I was very young, I’ve been fascinated by the mountains. I’ve always preferred silent hiking trails to beaches packed with ruddy bathers basted in lotion. I enjoy the physical challenge of the steep hillsides. I’m not the sporty type particularly, but what a great feeling when the blood starts racing through your temples, you’re trying to catch your breath and your legs are burning. For me, mountain stalking is the purest form of hunting there is. It’s the only time your quarry has a head start up a cliff side. The only hunt where I feel I’m on an extraordinary quest, beyond time. My great friend Dominique from Marseille, with the lilting accent to match, recently gave me a chance to hunt mouflon on Mont Caroux, near Béziers. This is the story of the intense, almost primitive, joy of that hunt.

  • Browning blog - Hunting chamois in Slovenia

    My first chamois: cast away on a sea of cloud

    I was recently lucky enough to fly to Slovenia to organise a Browning event. Slovenia, for anyone who doesn’t know, is a small country, formerly part of the Republic of Yugoslavia, on the borders of Italy, Austria, Hungary, and Croatia. It is a one-of-a-kind model for Europe. Hunters and naturalists live peacefully side by side, the mountains are unspoiled by mass tourism, and it has an extremely diverse and rich wildlife. It was in this idyllic setting that I had the chance to bag my first chamois, with the help of my great friend Peter Matjasic, owner of YouTube channel WaffenlandTV.  Read about my adventures below.

  • Browning blog - stalking the loch ness monster

    Stalking the Loch Ness monster!

    The Loch Ness monster: do you know the legend from the Highlands about the monster they call Nessie? No, it’s not about a marine animal with a long tail, but the first deer I stalked with such pride.

  • browning-blog-high-seat-hunting

    High-seat hunting: patience and discretion

    As with walk-up hunting, stalking large game demands patience, acute observation and absolute silence.  Originating in Germany, this practice is inspired – like the majority of hunting methods let us not forget – by the ruses used by some animals of prey in their natural surroundings to find food (from polar bear to pike, including big cats and snakes).

  • The Waiting Game

    Often out hunting the action either kicks off almost right away or when you are just thinking of going home; this tale really explains it. I was out with my daughter Chloe in October for some Roebuck and an evening’s lamping on rabbits. We were in a big high seat called the scaffold that takes two shooters. We set in at 15.00 and waited, and waited, by 17.00 I got the feeling nothing would happen so decided to sack it at 17.30.

  • Hunting waterfowl with the A5

    No, waterfowl is not a synonym for a wicked move during water polo, as I thought at first. This expression is used to describe all wild birds, both sedentary and migrant, mainly found in and around water such as ducks, waders, swans, geese, … To make things simpler, small game in an aquatic environment.